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The Exceptional Family Member Program and Family Member Relocation Clearance process is designed to prevent family members from moving to locations where their medical and educational needs cannot be met, safe-guarding families from reduction in services and promoting effective use of available health care resources. (Courtesy Photo) EFMP steps for smooth PCS
The EFMP and Family Member Relocation Clearance process is designed to prevent family members from moving to locations where their medical and educational needs cannot be met, safe-guarding families from reduction in services and promoting effective use of available health care resources
0 4/11
2017
(Courtesy Graphic) Supporting victims with Victim Advocates
The Volunteer Victim Advocate Program for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response office provides emotional support to victims of sexual assault.
0 4/06
2017
Steve McMullen speaks with an Airman regarding the Exceptional Family Member Program, its importance and how it benefits military families around the world, Mar. 27, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. McMullen is the Airman and Family Readiness Center school liaison officer and the EFMP family support coordinator at Fairchild. He provides coordination of family support services to EFMs who have physical, developmental, emotional or an intellectual impairment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Exceptional program for exceptional families
The Air Force Exceptional Family Member Program is one of the numerous support resources the Air Force makes available to Airmen and their families to ensure a healthy community and a positive quality of life.
0 4/03
2017
Lt. Col. Richard Rubin, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron flight surgeon, and his wife pose for a photo with Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, former Chief of Staff of the Air Force. Rubin discovered a new syndrome called the vision impairment and intracranial pressure syndrome while working for NASA between 2006 and 2009. (Courtesy photo) Fairchild Airman makes his mark on space travel
Working for NASA can be a life changing experience, but discovering a new syndrome affecting astronauts working in space is out of this world.
0 3/30
2017
Airman 1st Class Manuel Rivera Matos, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and construction journeyman, prepares the loader by switching out attachments Mar. 15, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The 92nd CES pavement and construction Airmen and civilians, often referred to as “Dirt Boyz,” were recently named the winners of the American Association of Airport Executives’ Balchen/Post Award for their outstanding performance in snow removal during the 2016 season. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) “Dirt Boyz” get dirty
The snow slams the windshield as the broom weaves back and forth across the Fairchild airfield. The 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and construction Airmen are no strangers to late night phone calls, dirt under their fingernails and the unpredictable intense weather that comes with living in the Pacific Northwest. They’re often referred to as “Dirt Boyz” for their constant interaction with more than 100 pieces of filthy heavy construction equipment and hand tools used to repair Fairchild’s roads, airfield, fences and drainage systems.
0 3/23
2017
Senior Airman Brandon Johnson is declared the victor in a match with Marine Michael Brant at the 2017 Armed Forces Championship Febuary 26, 2017, at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ. (U.S Air Force courtesy photo) Wrestling with success
Fairchild Airman makes it onto the United States Air Force Wrestling team in a display of dazzling skill and gritty determination.
0 3/22
2017
Airman 1st Class Ricky Quan, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration technician, completes work on an air conditioning unit in the Red Morgan Center Mar. 2, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. Maintaining an air conditioning unit involves greasing moving parts and replacing mechanical belts. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Some like it hot, HVAC keeps it cool
Whether snow, wind, rain or sunshine: Fairchild can experience every season within 24 hours and for Airmen working in the unpredictable weather, having a comfortable haven to retreat to, is a must. The 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron heating ventilation air conditioning and refrigeration Airmen contribute to rapid global mobility by ensuring Team Fairchild’s $5.7 billion mechanical infrastructure operates at peak performance.
0 3/06
2017
Information Technology Asset Management provides accountability of Air Force assets throughout their technology lifecycles, keeping track of when hardware and software needs to be purchased. Keeping track of IT assets for the Air Force allows for maximum return from equipment that is being purchased and utilized on a daily basis by thousands of Fairchild Air Force Base members. (U.S. Air Force Photo/ Airman 1st Class Sean Campbell) Asset management: keeping mission accountable
Accountability is essential to all operations in the Air Force. Without proper accountability the entire mission can be impacted in a negative way. With the help of Information Technology Asset Management having accurate accountability is a much easier task. Asset management provides accountability of Air Force assets throughout their technology
0 2/23
2017
(U.S. Air Force photo illustration by: A1C Ryan Lackey) Fairchild NCO escapes prison of abuse
Fairchild NCO shares tale of surviving and overcoming an abusive childhood to succeed in the Air Force.
0 2/15
2017
Airman 1st Class Christian Kinder, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron fire protection journeyman, conducts an engine check on an airport rescue vehicle Feb. 1, 2017, Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. Each morning Fairchild firefighters conduct checks, both monthly and daily, to ensure trucks and equipment are safe and operational. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Fairchild firefighters train to maintain readiness
Being responsible for thousands of lives, more than 4,000 acres of land and approximately 35 aircraft, the 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron fire department knows the importance of keeping their Airmen “rescue ready.”
0 2/07
2017
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