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  • Fairchild groups support one thing – Contact

    It’s a bright sky above the cloud deck; the outside temperature is minus 10 degrees, altitude is 22,000 feet with cruising speed of the vintage, KC-135 Stratotanker a steady 450 mph. The closing speed of the chasing C-17 Globemaster III is a steady 455 mph, and the countdown to contact begins: 50, 40, 30, 20, 10…contact!
  • Airmen helping Airmen: first sergeants

    The Airman could see the neon lights in the distance, growing as she neared the gas station. She knew there was an ample amount of alcohol inside; enough to re-stock her vacant liquor cabinet. Each day she willed herself to drive forward to her recovery class. Her alcohol addiction roared in her head, willing her hands to turn the car into the gas station parking lot. She wouldn’t this time, the next time or the time after. Fighting the craving, she pulled over and called her first sergeant to find counsel and relief.
  • Fairchild Airmen and Zion National Park Rangers rescue stranded climbers

    In the evening hours on March 17, two Airmen were hiking through the trails of a national park, when they came across another group of hikers who heard calls for help.
  • Airman brings CBRN knowledge to Fairchild

    Early in the morning basic trainees are rushed into a large room, they follow in previous Airmen’s footsteps and listen to instructions telling them why they’re on site. Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Chemical gear is handed out one-by-one as trainees begin to inspect every aspect of their equipment and don it properly before the room is flooded with gas.
  • Fairchild's SERE school supports NASA mission

    A team of NASA astronauts, contractors and engineers came to Fairchild Air Force Base to complete the water survival course hosted by the 336th Training Group’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape specialists.
  • Fairchild’s Finest: Airman 1st Class Kyle Tidwell

    Airman 1st Class Kyle Tidwell, 92nd Operation Support Squadron airfield systems technician, maintains ground to air communications navigational aids and the weather systems. He was selected as a Fairchild’s Finest. “The support from my shop and my supervisors are what lead me in the right direction to achieve Fairchild’s Finest,” said Tidwell. “My
  • Leaders Inspiring For Tomorrow 2018

    Eight guest speakers provided practical and personal talks about the qualities of leadership when they graced the stage at Fairchild during the second annual Leaders Inspiring For Tomorrow event on Apr 27, 2018.
  • Togo native made to be an American Airman

    Airman 1st Class Kofi Combey Douhadji, 92nd Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle operator, along with his wife and four-year-old daughter, participated in the online Diversity Visa Lottery Program. The program provides a limited number of visas each fiscal year to a class of immigrants known as “diversity immigrants” from countries with historically low rates of immigration to the U.S. Douhadji and his family were selected by the program to immigrate to the U.S. with a 10-year visa. Douhadji and his family arrived in El Paso, Texas on September 27, 2016, after a lot of paperwork, a long investigation and many interviews. After only being in the U.S. for six months, Douhadji was inspired to enlist in the United States Air Force in March 2017.
  • DOD continuous evaluation program and you

    After a long week of work, an Airman finds himself at a squadron party at their supervisor’s house. As they search the house for a bathroom, they accidently walk into a bedroom and witness their supervisor, who is married, getting intimate with someone other than their spouse. The person appears to be a foreign national and does not seem to speak English. Surprised by the interruption, the foreign national grabs the supervisor’s wallet and immediately leaves the house. The supervisor begs to the Airman not to tell their spouse. After leaving the party, the Airman ponders on whether they should report the incident.
  • Fairchild Airman goes back to his Haitian roots

    As a child, if Iram Edmond had a crystal ball to see his future, he’d know one day he’d get to ride in one of the planes he’d watch fly over his neighborhood in Haiti. As a young boy, he didn’t understand that the world was much bigger than what he observed outside his front door.
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