Communications Airmen show career field to students

STEM

Senior Airman Johnny Mitchell, 92nd Comunication Squadron infrastructure technician talks to Spokane area high school students about different equipment that the CS uses during a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math event, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Feb. 8, 2018.The event included two main parts, the first part included a briefing on Air Force communications and a tour of the 92nd CS building. The second part was a hands-on exercise where students got to work with communication equipment. (Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Sean Campbell)

STEm

1st Lt. Michael Brittan, 92nd Communications Squadron information technology flight commander, briefs Spokane area high school students about Air Force life during a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math event, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Feb. 8, 2018. The event served as an opportunity to bridge the gap between education, industry and the military and show more than 30 students what the military has to offer them. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senor Airman Sean Campbell)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- The 92nd Communications Squadron recently held a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math event, the first of its kind, here where they partnered with Greater Spokane Incorporated to bring different Spokane area high school students to come visit February 8th, 2018.

This STEM event aimed to give local Spokane area students a better insight of the Air Force and show them how the communications squadron impacts the military mission.

“It’s good to open up the Air Force to the next generation of youth that might be joining and show them the different opportunities in technology that the Air Force offers,” said Senior Airman Johnny Mitchell, 92nd CS infrastructure technician. “We pull the curtain down and show them a lot of opportunities. We have a lot of technology jobs that can take them far in life with the skills that they would learn.”

The event served as an opportunity to bridge the gap between education, industry and the military and show more than 30 students what the military has to offer them. The STEM event was the brain child of Mitchell, 1st Lt. Michael Brittan, 92nd CS information technology flight commander, Staff Sgt. Amanda Morgan, 92nd CS server admin.

The CS team worked with GSI on what the event would look like and how many students would be able to attend. The event included two main parts, the first part included a briefing on Air Force communications and a tour of the 92nd CS building. The second part was a hands-on exercise where students got to work with communication equipment.

“I had them program a switch and connect to a router that I controlled acting as the internet so they went from nothing to having a connection,” said Mitchell. “I went through the basics of how the internet works and got them exposed to equipment.”



“Overall, the event is a positive way to foster community relationships,” said Brittan. “It allows the community to learn what we do here, gain insight about our mission and see we are people just like them.”