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Stay alive to enjoy the ride: free motorcycle safety class

William Mace, 92nd Medical Support Squadron medical material manager, rides his motorcycle during the Motorcycle Expo April 7, 2016, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. Currently, Fairchild has a riding population of more than 150 riders, and everyone is required to follow the same guidelines and wear the proper equipment when riding on base, and military motorcyclists must follow the same rules off base, as well. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Taylor Bourgeous)

William Mace, 92nd Medical Support Squadron medical material manager, rides his motorcycle during the Motorcycle Expo April 7, 2016, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The Air Force requires Airmen to earn their BRS2 certificate within one year of initial training completion and to attend refresher training every five years thereafter. (Courtesy Photo)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- Team Fairchild 92nd Air Refueling Wing safety officials are providing a free intermediate motorcycle safety class scheduled to inform and train Airmen on current policies at 8 a.m., at the installation motorcycle range July 26.

The intermediate motorcycle safety class is being held to mitigate risks as motorcycle riding continues to be a leading cause of fatal mishaps for Airmen.

“The Basic Rider Course 2 is an intermediate-level motorcyclist course,” said William Mace, 92nd Medical Support Squadron safety manager. “It helps build on new rider skills and refreshes those who have been riding on emergency responses they may not have practiced or used in a while.”

Motorcycle riding comes with inherent risk no matter the experience level, but proper training can lessen the occurrence and severity of mishaps.

“For those who are newer riders, it helps them take their riding skills to the next level and be more confident in emergency response, should the need arise,” Mace said. “You can ride a motorcycle with basic knowledge, but if [riders] haven't been practicing emergency response techniques, riders might not have the skills they need to respond or react in an emergency situation.”

The Air Force requires Airmen to earn their BRS2 certificate within one year of initial training completion and to attend refresher training every five years thereafter.

“We pay for new riders to complete the initial training provided by the state and offer intermediate classes on base during the summer months,” said Mark Rupert, 92nd ARW occupational safety manager. “To be reimbursed, Airmen can bring their certificates into the 92nd ARW Safety Office.”

For more information on motorcycle safety class schedules, requirements and other resources, contact your squadron motorcycle safety representative or the 92nd ARW Safety Office at (509) 247-2143.