Fairchild wraps up ‘furious’ exercise

KC-135 Stratotankers stand ready on the flight line during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

KC-135 Stratotankers stand ready on the flight line during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Airmen from the 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron work to remove a refueling pod from the wingtip of a KC-135 Stratotanker at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Airmen from the 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron work to remove a refueling pod from the wingtip of a KC-135 Stratotanker at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Airman 1st Class Kwame Edwards, 92nd Maintenance Squadron crew chief, takes off panels and lines from a KC-135 Stratotanker multi-point refueling system pod during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Airman 1st Class Kwame Edwards, 92nd Maintenance Squadron crew chief, takes off panels and lines from a KC-135 Stratotanker multi-point refueling system pod during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Airman 1st Class Nikolaus Hernandezsire, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, pushes a nitrogen servicing cart during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The nitrogen servicing cart is used to service certain aircraft, is fully automatic and operates in all types of weather. It is a self-contained, enclosed, skid mount, electric driven designed to produce gaseous Nitrogen to support multiple airframes. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Airman 1st Class Nikolaus Hernandezsire, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, pushes a nitrogen servicing cart during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The nitrogen servicing cart is used to service certain aircraft, is fully automatic and operates in all types of weather. It is a self-contained, enclosed, skid mount, electric driven designed to produce gaseous Nitrogen to support multiple airframes. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Senior Airman Andrew Kowalski, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, monitors the progress of maintenance efforts on a KC-135 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Senior Airman Andrew Kowalski, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, monitors the progress of maintenance efforts on a KC-135 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Staff Sgt. Thomas Long and Airman 1st Class Lance Whisenhunt, both 718th Maintenance Squadron flying crew chiefs, perform a trunnion cap check during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski)

Staff Sgt. Thomas Long and Airman 1st Class Lance Whisenhunt, both 718th Maintenance Squadron flying crew chiefs, perform a trunnion cap check during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski)

Airman 1st Class Dominick Castro, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, refills a tire on a KC-135 Stratotanker with nitrogen at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

Airman 1st Class Dominick Castro, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, refills a tire on a KC-135 Stratotanker with nitrogen at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Lackey)

A KC-135 Stratotanker stands ready on the flight line during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski)

A KC-135 Stratotanker stands ready on the flight line during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samantha Krolikowski)

Airman 1st Class Jesse Marquez, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron aircraft electrical and environmental systems apprentice, changes the terminal on a boom signal coil voltmeter during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

Airman 1st Class Jesse Marquez, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron aircraft electrical and environmental systems apprentice, changes the terminal on a boom signal coil voltmeter during an exercise Sept. 11, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The KC-135 is an aerial refueling platform capable of delivering more than 200,000 pounds of fuel to U.S. and allied nation aircraft globally at a moment's notice. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño)

92nd Maintenance Squadron Airmen attach a tow bar to a specialized ground vehicle before moving a KC-135 Stratotanker into a hangar at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Sept. 11, 2017.  The KC-135 Stratotanker is the primary air refueling aircraft for the United States Air Force and has been doing so for more than 50 years. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Sean Campbell)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 11

92nd Maintenance Squadron Airmen attach a tow bar to a specialized ground vehicle before moving a KC-135 Stratotanker into a hangar at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 Stratotanker is the primary air refueling aircraft for the United States Air Force and has been doing so for more than 50 years. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Sean Campbell)

92nd Maintenance Squadron Airmen prepare to move a KC-135 Stratotanker during the Titan Fury exercise at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Sept. 11, 2017.  The KC-135 Stratotanker is the primary air refueling aircraft for the United States Air Force and has been doing so for more than 50 years. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Sean Campbell)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

92nd Maintenance Squadron Airmen prepare to move a KC-135 Stratotanker during the Titan Fury exercise at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., Sept. 11, 2017. The KC-135 Stratotanker is the primary air refueling aircraft for the United States Air Force and has been doing so for more than 50 years. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Sean Campbell)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- Team Fairchild concluded three days of high-powered operations, superior teamwork and the conscientious efforts of Airmen, resulting in a highly successful conclusion to exercise “Titan Fury” here Sept. 15, 2017.

This operational readiness exercise is used to validate and improve existing plans and procedures for Fairchild Airmen as required by the U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Transportation Command.

"Titan Fury is an important exercise for Team Fairchild in defending the U.S. against its most crucial threats," said Herb Henderson, 92nd Air Refueling Wing exercise planner and operations security manager. "Exercises like these allow us to really observe how well we cooperate as a military and as an Air Force.”

Although specifics of these exercises are classified, KC-135 Stratotankers play an integral role in the success of the Air Force mission. Maintenance Airmen are critical to ensuring Fairchild aircraft are ready to respond.

"Teamwork is absolutely essential to generating the required amount of aircraft for an exercise like this," said Col. Alan Hart, 92nd Maintenance Group commander. "We work hard to ensure the mission is a success, and I’m exceedingly proud of the work our Airmen do to make it happen, whether during an exercise or daily operations."

Overall, the abilities and professionalism of the tanker force help ensure that U.S. and allied air-power can be projected around the world; 24/7, 365 days a year.

“As part of a larger picture, these exercises demonstrate unparalleled capabilities and resolve to potential adversaries, providing credible deterrence against dangerous military actions in any potential strategic conflict,” Henderson said.