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Fairchild Airmen give back

Lt. Col. James Dorn, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron commander, and 1st Lt. Dan Reed, 92nd AMXS aircraft maintenance unit officer in charge, accept the Neal Fosseen Award from Spokane Mayor, David Condon, during a community event May 19, 2016, in Spokane, Wash. The 92nd AMXS has won this prestigious award two years in a row for thousands of man-hours dedicated to the Spokane community and their overall excellence in community service.

Lt. Col. James Dorn, 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron commander, and 1st Lt. Dan Reed, 92nd AMXS aircraft maintenance unit officer in charge, accept the Neal Fosseen Award from Spokane Mayor, David Condon, during a community event May 19, 2016, in Spokane, Wash. The 92nd AMXS has won this prestigious award two years in a row for thousands of man-hours dedicated to the Spokane community and their overall excellence in community service.

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- "The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something," said Barack Obama, President of the United States of America. "Don't wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope."

Fairchild Air Force Base Airmen are no strangers to President Obama's ideology. With all the time devoted to the mission, their families and their hobbies, Fairchild Airmen continue to put in the hard work, dedication and time to give back to their community.

Recently, the 92nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron took home the Neal Fosseen Award for the second year running. The Neal Fosseen Award is awarded to an organization within the military for outstanding commitment to community service. During 2015, the 92nd AMXS dedicated nearly 10,000 hours, raised more than $1 million, donated close to 3,500 meals and collected approximately 70,000 pounds of goods for local charities.

"The Neal Fosseen Award is extremely important to our squadron because it demonstrates our commitment and dedication to the local community," said Lt. Col. James Dorn, 92nd AMXS commander. "The people of Spokane, via their exceptional military support, make it easy for us to want to give back. Of the many communities I've lived in during my Air Force career, Spokane and the surrounding communities are certainly at the top of the list. I know many of the 92nd AMXS personnel feel the same."

Although the 92nd AMXS retains a tight grip on their title for excellent community service for another year, various other Fairchild organizations are up for the challenge.

The 92nd Communications Squadron, the 92nd Medical Operations Squadron and the 242nd Combat Communications Squadron were a few of the other Fairchild units considered for the Neal Fosseen Award for their superior community service during 2015. Some of their efforts included assisting more than 50 Spokane-area veterans, coaching nearly 400 local youth, re-building 10 community homes and giving back close to $400,000 to various organizations on and around Fairchild.

"Our mission of refueling freedom is executed every day because of exceptional people doing extraordinary things," said Col. Brian McDaniel, 92nd Air Refueling Wing commander. "The Spokane community has embraced Fairchild AFB and our Airmen, so I'm glad to see them giving back to the community and I'm proud to be a part of the selfless Team Fairchild."

Numerous Airmen from all of the units, squadrons and groups associated with Fairchild can be found giving back to their community in one way or another. At a recent community event, Fairchild Airmen captured four out of the five 2016 Armed Forces Person of the Year awards given to outstanding military service members amongst the Spokane Community. These awards are provided to military members of all ranks who outshine their peers amongst all military service branches.

There are many Airmen from Team Fairchild who continue to give back despite never being formally recognized. Integrity, one of the Air Force core values, refers to one's moral character and the adherence to ethical principles. What a person chooses to do when no one is watching, portrays their measure of character.

Team Fairchild isn't only practicing integrity on the flight line, while turning wrenches, securing the base, writing contracts or measuring heart rates; Fairchild Airmen can be found anywhere, anytime helping those around them with the utmost integrity.