HomeNewsFeaturesDisplay

Fairchild EOD supports FBI, ATF investigations

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Charles Kirwan (left), Airman 1st Class Travis Callahan (middle) and Airman 1st Class Kyle Riley, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians, pose for a photo at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Feb. 16, 2021. Fairchild’s EOD emergency response spans an 85-thousand square mile radius supporting federal and local law enforcement agencies throughout Washington, Northern Idaho and select counties in Montana and Oregon. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anneliese Kaiser)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Charles Kirwan (left), Airman 1st Class Travis Callahan (middle) and Airman 1st Class Kyle Riley, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians, pose for a photo at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, Feb. 16, 2021. Fairchild’s EOD emergency response spans an 85-thousand square mile radius supporting federal and local law enforcement agencies throughout Washington, Northern Idaho and select counties in Montana and Oregon. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anneliese Kaiser)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE, Wash. --

Team Fairchild’s 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal flight successfully supported the Federal Bureau of Investigations and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), in the identification and removal of potentially hazardous ordnances.

Both investigations occurred within a week of each other with one taking place in Worley, Idaho and the other in Airway Heights, where approximately four different devices and substances were safely removed and identified by the EOD team.

 “Our team gathered the items reported, and proceeded to X-ray them,” said Airman 1st Class Kyle Riley, 92nd CES EOD technician. “We found a large firecracker with a fill-line for a potentially dangerous substance, a training grenade with an expended fuse, two auxiliary fuses for a landmine and a pound of black powder.”

Upon identifying the devices and substances as safe for transport, the team secured the items and transported them for storage as evidence supporting the ongoing FBI and ATF investigations.

“For any ordnance that can be handled, especially military munitions, we’re first to get the call,” said Senior Airman Charles Kirwan, 92nd CES EOD technician. “Our goal is to protect personal property through the mitigation of explosive hazards.”

Fairchild’s EOD emergency response spans an 85-thousand square mile radius supporting federal and local law enforcement agencies throughout Washington, Northern Idaho and select counties in Montana and Oregon.

By maintaining a strong community partnership with local and federal law enforcement teams, such as the FBI and ATF, Fairchild’s EOD team is able to ensure the success and safety of any response while also receiving any support they need in disposing of ordnance, Riley said.

Additionally through the support of their community partners, EOD can continue safely detecting, identifying and disposing of any potentially hazardous ordnance, ensuring the safety of the Fairchild and Inland Northwest community.