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92nd SFS implements new virtual reality training, improves use of force techniques

VR training

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ryan Hanlon (left), 92nd Security Forces Squadron training instructor operates a virtual reality system while U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bruin Dew (right), 92nd SFS phase one trainer goes through a use of force scenario April 19, 2021 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The VR system scenarios are able to be adjusted by the trainer as they play out, so they can be more unpredictable and in turn, more realistic to the trainee. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anneliese Kaiser)

VR training

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bruin Dew, 92nd Security Forces Squadron phase one trainer, poses for a photo wearing virtual reality equipment April 19, 2021 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. the 92nd SFS is equipped with two VR systems that can each train one SFS Airman at a time and they can repeat the 31 available scenarios as many times as needed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anneliese Kaiser)

VR training

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bruin Dew, 92nd Security Forces Squadron phase one trainer, goes through a use of force scenario April 19, 2021 at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The M-18 pistol, which the security forces career field will be transitioning to soon, the M-4 rifle and a taser are the weapons compatible with the VR system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anneliese Kaiser)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. --

The 92nd Security Forces Squadron received Street Smart Virtual Reality systems from the Air Mobility Command, January 2021, to enhance use-of-force training.

 

These VR systems are equipped with 31 different training scenarios that can be adjusted as they play out, creating a more unpredictable and realistic training environment for trainees.

 

“This system allows our Airmen to get way more training repetitions in a cost-effective way,” said Staff Sgt. Ryan Hanlon, 92nd SFS training instructor. “They gain more confidence performing the training in a simulated environment before interacting with people in real-world scenarios.”

 

Prior to the arrival of these new systems, the only use-of-force practice in place was to act out scenarios with issued weapons and fire simulation rounds.

 

“On the computer screen we can see what the person with the VR set can see,” Hanlon said. “In the bottom corner of the computer screen we have branching options, so we can simulate both de-escalated and escalated scenarios, depending on how the trainee is performing in that simulation.”

 

Like any new technology, this VR system has the potential to advance over time, improving training capabilities and expanding the amount of scenarios SFS Airmen can face while on duty, Hanlon said.

 

“I think the VR systems are working out really well, especially with all the new Airmen coming in,” said Senior Airman Bruin Dew 92nd SFS phase-one trainer. “Having the system helps them get a chance to practice their commands, verbal skills and understand that not every scenario is going to work out the way they think.”

 

By implementing the use of virtual reality, Team Fairchild’s 92nd SFS Airmen can continue making innovative strides in improving training, use of resources and advancing warfighting capabilities.