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The Fairchild Honor Guard conducts military funeral training Nov. 16, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. Honor guard’s mission is unlike any other, spending upward of 60 hours a week together traveling, training and preparing for ceremonies. The Fairchild Honor Guard covers the entire Pacific Northwest community, displaying their precision and excellence in Washington, Montana, Idaho and Oregon. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Taking a step outside of their AFSC: Honor Guard NCO in charge
With a sharp click of a heel and distinct command, a line of disciplined honor guardsmen begin to fold the American flag with grace, precision and determination. The rendering of military funeral honors for veterans is not only mandated by law, it’s the responsibility and duty of Air Force Honor Guardsmen around the world.
0 11/20
2017
MMA War or the Cage
The day’s pent-up energy reaches a climax, his lime green “autistic kids rock!” t-shirt stands out in the bustling room, a clear sign that Tyler McGuire has entered the cage. Standing across from him is his opponent whose goal is to take him down.The crowd buzzes with excitement as Staff Sgt. Tyler McGuire, 66th Training Squadron operations NCO in
0 11/16
2017
Master Sgt. Lance Hasz, 92nd Force Support Squadron Career Assistance Advisor, talks with Airmen during an Informed Decision Briefing Oct. 27, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. Hasz is one of less than 100 CAAs Air Force-wide. His position focuses on three vital aspects: customer service, regulated courses such as FTAC and professional development. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Taking a step outside of their AFSC: Career Assistance Advisor
Whether arriving at their first duty station or nearing the end of their first enlistment, Airmen are required to receive face-to-face training with some of their base’s leading experts on all things Air Force. These experts meet in forums such as Informed Decision Briefings, First Term Airman Center courses, NCO and senior NCO Professional Enhancement Seminars and various professional development courses that prepare and develop Airmen, young and old, about how to face everyday challenges.
0 11/09
2017
DCC Program gives Airmen pride, ownership DCC Program gives Airmen pride, ownership
Leaders from the 92nd and 141st AMXSs implemented the Designated Crew Chief Program early this year, an initiative to directly assign maintenance personnel to each aircraft in order to provide continuity and accuracy of aircraft documentation, status, maintenance schedules and improve overall aircraft appearance.
0 8/08
2017
Father Juan Salonga, 92nd Air Refueling GS Catholic Priest, leads a catholic Easter service April 16, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington.  The chaplain corps exists to support free exercise of religion according to the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America. At each base, chaplains support the religious freedom of Airmen and their families and help with spiritual resilience. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Sean Campbell) Chapel embraces religious freedom
The base chapel highlights the significance of religious freedom as a foundational human right. It provides Airmen and their families a community who experience similar life events such as frequent moves and high work tempo.
0 4/19
2017
92nd Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters work together to rescue a downed firefighter during a demonstration of their Rapid Intervention Crew training Mar. 29, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The demonstration was part of a visit by Col. James Kossler, Air Force Installation and Mission Support Center Detachment 9 commander, to show the progression and implementation of RIC training. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) 92nd CES fire department implements life-saving training
Being a firefighter is one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Entering a structure fire as the flames start to grow, oxygen levels diminish and the heat steadily rises to over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit is just a normal day of the week for a firefighter.
0 4/18
2017
The Exceptional Family Member Program and Family Member Relocation Clearance process is designed to prevent family members from moving to locations where their medical and educational needs cannot be met, safe-guarding families from reduction in services and promoting effective use of available health care resources. (Courtesy Photo) EFMP steps for smooth PCS
The EFMP and Family Member Relocation Clearance process is designed to prevent family members from moving to locations where their medical and educational needs cannot be met, safe-guarding families from reduction in services and promoting effective use of available health care resources
0 4/11
2017
Steve McMullen speaks with an Airman regarding the Exceptional Family Member Program, its importance and how it benefits military families around the world, Mar. 27, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. McMullen is the Airman and Family Readiness Center school liaison officer and the EFMP family support coordinator at Fairchild. He provides coordination of family support services to EFMs who have physical, developmental, emotional or an intellectual impairment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) Exceptional program for exceptional families
The Air Force Exceptional Family Member Program is one of the numerous support resources the Air Force makes available to Airmen and their families to ensure a healthy community and a positive quality of life.
0 4/03
2017
Lt. Col. Richard Rubin, 92nd Aerospace Medicine Squadron flight surgeon, and his wife pose for a photo with Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, former Chief of Staff of the Air Force. Rubin discovered a new syndrome called the vision impairment and intracranial pressure syndrome while working for NASA between 2006 and 2009. (Courtesy photo) Fairchild Airman makes his mark on space travel
Working for NASA can be a life changing experience, but discovering a new syndrome affecting astronauts working in space is out of this world.
0 3/30
2017
Airman 1st Class Manuel Rivera Matos, 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and construction journeyman, prepares the loader by switching out attachments Mar. 15, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The 92nd CES pavement and construction Airmen and civilians, often referred to as “Dirt Boyz,” were recently named the winners of the American Association of Airport Executives’ Balchen/Post Award for their outstanding performance in snow removal during the 2016 season. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Mackenzie Richardson) “Dirt Boyz” get dirty
The snow slams the windshield as the broom weaves back and forth across the Fairchild airfield. The 92nd Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and construction Airmen are no strangers to late night phone calls, dirt under their fingernails and the unpredictable intense weather that comes with living in the Pacific Northwest. They’re often referred to as “Dirt Boyz” for their constant interaction with more than 100 pieces of filthy heavy construction equipment and hand tools used to repair Fairchild’s roads, airfield, fences and drainage systems.
0 3/23
2017
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