ISO Management making 2040 happen

ISO management

Tech. Sgt. Donald McCurdy, 92nd Maintenance Squadron hydraulics specialist, supervises a simulation gear retraction July 26, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The periodic inspection production supervisor works directly with the flight chiefs and maintenance officers. He coordinates and directs all maintenance and inspections for the periodic inspection phase. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Sean Campbell)

ISO management

Senior Airman Joseph Roy, 92nd Maintenance Squadron sheet metal technician, attaches a panel to a KC-135 Stratotanker, July 26, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The Isochronal Inspection is conducted every two years by a total force team of Airmen. They inspect the entirety of the aircraft and fix issues that are found.

ISO management

Staff Sgt. Rachel Crofoot, 141st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, works on a KC-135 Stratotanker during an Isochronal Inspection July 26, 2017, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The Air Force wants to keep the KC-135 Stratotanker in the air for many years to come. The efforts made by the ISO is what makes this possible, because of them the KC-135 will see the year 2040. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Sean Campbell)

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- A major contributor to the longevity of KC-135 Stratotankers is the effort of the Isochronal Inspection team.

ISO Inspection is conducted every two years by a total force team of Airmen. They inspect the entirety of the aircraft and max sure any issues that are found are fixed by the proper people.

They give themselves four days to look at a jet inside and out.

“We have 96 hours to get the entire aircraft inspected,” said Tech. Sgt. Derrick Brooke, 92nd Maintenance Squadron periodic inspection production supervisor. “That involves every shop from the crew chiefs as part of the ISO shop to the hydraulics shop, jet engine mechanics, sheet metal, communication navigation guidance and control.”

Brooke works directly with flight chiefs and maintenance officers to coordinate and direct the periodic inspection phase.

“I’m in charge of the time tables,” said Brooke. “A big part of this job is the coordination between several Air Force Specialty Codes to ensure things are done the right and safe way. And that we are getting the best aircraft out there to the flight line.”

Next in the management chain after Brooke is the floor supervisor. The floor supervisor is the eyes and ears of the periodic inspection production supervisor. Floor supervisors ensure Airmen are getting what they need to accomplish a task, and communication is flowing out on the floor, as well as back to the periodic inspection production supervisor.

“Under the floor supervisor there are different areas of the aircraft, one through four,” Brooke said. “Each area of an aircraft has a lead. This is someone who is extremely knowledgeable in their area and how to lead people. Leads ensure inspections are getting done, lubrications are getting accomplished and the fixes are getting completed, in an efficient matter. Below them is going to be your three- and five-levels who are working toward being an area lead.”

“As an area lead you need to know what is going on at all times,” said Senior Airman Kara Fernandez, 92nd Maintenance Squadron periodic inspection journeyman. “You manage maintenance and make sure the individuals working in your area are completing the tasks that need to be done in order of priority. Showing leadership and mentorship to those individual Airman is also very important because they are going to be the area leads in the future.”

The Air Force wants to keep the KC-135 Stratotanker in the air till 2040. The efforts made by the ISO is what makes this possible.